Sweet Fifteen Tips

Build a close relationship with each of the following fifteen tips to build a solid game foundation.

 

Tip 1

Ball position is vital to consistent contact. A ball too far forward will cause you to move laterally; a ball too far back will cause you to hang on your right side and not transfer your weight. your irons should be placed starting with your short irons at your sternum and moved progressively forward to your left breast and move progressively forward to your left armpit

Tip 2

Golf is a target game and the ball is placed at midpoint in the motion. in other words, when the club head reaches the ball, the motion is only half over. Players who direct their focus to completing their motion to finish are swingers. I like to teach complete motions to full balanced finishes. i see this thought of completion producing the best results. the ball is simply midpoint!

Reminder; A great tip when taking a golf lesson or any motor skill instruction: “One inch is a mile.” Don’t try to over do or over try. Golf instruction takes time and repetition. Don’t go to extremes. Often slight changes in your physical movement will cause huge ball flight changes.

Tip 3

If you can build a good structured backswing, you can store a tremendous amount of energy to be unleashed in the forward motion. There are three 90 degree angles that if built properly, will make your backswing condition extremely powerful. 1) The right arm bend at the elbow should form a perfect 90 degree angle. 2) The shoulders should turn 90 degrees from address. 3) The left arm and club shaft should form a 90 degree angle at this time.

Tip 4

Two of the biggest myths in golf instruction are “keep our head down” and “keep your left arm straight.” First, people must understand that you don’t miss shots because your head comes up. In fact, it’s because of poor body movements. Second, the thought of keeping your left arm straight will create tension and impede speed in your swinging motion. Also, if you try to keep your head down, you’ll wind up not properly releasing your weight to your left side during your follow-through motion.

So let both arms relax (even your left), allow them to swing with freedom, and allow your entire body (including your head) release to a full level finish. You’ll hit better shots with great ease.

Tip 5

I call transition, that is, when the back swing ends and the down swing begins, “the fork in the road.” This is the moment when most players try to add a little something to their effort and destroy the very fragile sequence that leads to impact. Remember, the road to impact is a very gradual increase in speed, never sudden!

Reminder: Someone once said that “practice makes perfect, that’s incorrect, in fact, perfect practice makes perfect.” You first need to statistically chart your golf rounds to truly understand your weakness, then organize by time percentage what areas of your game need the most attention.

Tip 6

Swing your club to the top of your backswing. If your right arm (right-handed player) forms a perfect right angle, chances are your left arm is in a relatively extended condition. This is an example of a good backswing radius. Radius, in fact, is a speed source. Try again, only this time purposely cause your right arm to completely collapse. Notice now that your left arm also now sags. the radius of you back swing is almost non-existent. the right arm should structure the left in the backswing.

Tip 7

A reverse pivot at times occurs because your shoulders invert in your backswing rather than rotate level relevant to your address posture. To cure this, grip your club with the head of the club at knee level and make some swings. It may help to do this in front of a mirror. It will help you to feel the plane that your shoulders should rotate on and prevent the reverse pivot.

Reminder: Someone once said that “practice makes perfect, that’s incorrect, in fact, perfect practice makes perfect.” You first need to statistically chart your golf rounds to truly understand your weakness, then organize by time percentage what areas of your game need the most attention.

Tip 8

Students often say, “Well, I saw that out-of-bounds right and hit my ball dead left, and i was scared of the lake on the left and pushed my drive dead right.” I’ll answer by saying, “When you drive down the highway at 65-70 mph, do you look at the guard rail or do you look at the road? Make a mistake on the road and you die, make a mistake on the golf course , you may at worst lose a shot or a ball.” Keep your emotions in perspective and play golf without fear.

Tip 9

Next time you have a chip shot to hit from the fringe from a less-than-average lie, you might want to try a 7 wood vs. a 7 iron if you carry one. this design of most metal 7 woods leading edges will help you get down and through with little resistance. The length of the shaft may take some getting used to in terms os distance control and it shouldn’t take long.

Tip 10

If you find your ball snug up against a deep fringe around the green, but not completely in it, and contact with any club is difficult; try this! Take out your putter and turn it sideways so the toe of the putter is pointing directly at the ball. Make a few rehearsal motions to get the feeling of creating a downward blow with the nose of the putter head. Because the surface of the nose of the putter is so small it may take a little practice to find solid contact, but once you master that, you’ll never ha ve problems with that lie at all.

Tip 11

Face is in fact the case. You as a golfer must understand the club face and its conditions. Your goal is to get your club face back to a square position at impact. I feel the face is not the only, but the most dramatic influence of your ball flight. Simply stand in front of a mirror and make some swings; watch the club face. It should rotate open during your back swing, begin during your down swing to rotate back to your square by impact, then continue to rotate closed into your follow-through and finish. As you do this in the mirror, “see and feel” to capture the sensation of a proper club face rotation so you can emulate it during your actual swing.

Tip 12

I call transition, that is when the back swing ends and the down swing begins, “the fork in the road.” This, I feel, needs to be a very patient, quiet moment. This is the moment when most players try to add a little something to their effort and destroy the very fragile sequence that leads to impact. Remember, the road to impact is a very gradual increase in speed, never sudden!

Reminder: Someone once said that “practice makes perfect, that’s incorrect, in fact, perfect practice makes perfect.” You first need to statistically chart your golf rounds to truly understand your weakness, then organize by time percentage what areas of your game need the most attention.

Tip 13

If you suffer from the classic “over the top chop” and big slices, you must learn to correct “the path” of your swing. All you’ll need is a 5 or 6 iron, a handful of tees, a pile of practice balls, and a 2×4. Lay the 2×4 so it is in line with your target and standing so its 4-inch side is vertical. then tee up a ball about 2 inches away from the board at about the board’s midpoint. Practice hitting shots now. If you come over the top, you’ll clip the board before you reach the ball. You’ll quickly learn to attack your ball from a more inside path and be on the way to straighter shots!!

Tip 14

During a time when we hear so much about the shoulder turn, the pivoting of the hips, I feel the structure (radius) of arm swing is overlooked and under-coached. To maintain a proper radius (a major speed source), never allow the right arm at the elbow joint to fold beyond 90 degrees. This will keep the left arm in an extended condition. Mirror this on the forward swing with the left elbow joint and the right arm and the radius of the arm swing will be a huge aid in creating speed in your swing.

Tip 15

For amateurs pitching or lobbing the ball over a bunker can be a scary experience. Usually, their fear is greatly increased by a lack of understanding of technique. amateurs must understand that most short game shots are “specialty shots” and full swing technique rules “need not apply” You’ve heard the term “one piece takeaway.” This is great for producing long, boring, driving shots, not for high, soft pitches or lobs. To produce this type of shot, you need the opposite of a one piece take away. you need an early wrist cock to get the club shaft vertical quickly. this shaft angle will help produce high arcing shots needed to loft your ball over a bunker.

 

Tom Patri

Tom Patri, PGA Professional, has been a teacher, coach, and mentor to new players, the recreational player, as well as the tournament player, for over 30 years and 50,000+ lesson hours.

His background in golf not only includes the lesson tee and the classroom but his playing background has allowed him to truly understand what you the student goes through each time you play this wonderful and challenging game.
Tom Patri

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